About two weeks ago, I, together with my family, went to SM Megamall to apply for a passport. We missed some requirements so we got declined. We were told to return within (and not more than) a month to provide the needed requirements and finally process our passport. We went to the nearby food court in the mall and had a family meeting right then and there. We talked about the documents we should have when we come back. It didn’t help that the staff were a bit rude and actually non-accommodating, so that pissed off my mom.

So what did I miss exactly? I only had my PhilHealth card, an SSS E-1 form (no card yet), and an NBI Clearance, and they still weren’t enough to pass as requirements for the passport application (more on this later). I needed more valid IDs and supporting documents.The fastest (and one of the valid ones) ID I could have is the  Postal ID.

The government website has a summary of the requirements, procedures, and fees when applying for a Postal ID, but some information provided are already outdated. And my aim is to share my personal experience so you can have a more realistic idea of how the process goes. I know it’s easy to look up things online, but while doing my research on the requirements, I found out that some articles are already too old to be considered valid. Hopefully, this blog post of mine proves to be more helpful! In case you want a shorter version, just click here.  Or  skip to the latter part of my blog post for the recap!

According to GOV.PH,  you need the following document requirements to apply for a Postal ID:

  • Duly accomplished application form (available at phlpost.gov.ph and at nationwide capture-sites)
  • Original and photocopy of birth certificate from the National Statistics Office or the Local Civil Registry
  • Original and photocopy of proof of address (barangay clearance or utility bill showing the applicant’s name and address
    (married females will also need to present a marriage certificate, while minors need to be accompanied by a parent or guardian)

I don’t have a utility bill named after me since I don’t pay bills for our household yet, so I needed to get a Barangay Clearance first.  Once I had the Barangay Clearance, I was good for the  Postal ID application (I already had my NSO Birth Certificate – both original and photocopy – so that was one less problem for me).

Related: How To Get A Barangay Clearance: Requirements, Procedures, Fees 


Here’s a blow-by-blow account on how to apply for a  Postal ID:

  1. FIND YOUR CITY’S POST OFFICE. I live in San Juan, so my post office is just near Agora Market (N. Domingo). Directly across it, actually. It’s a jeep away from my house so it’s no hassle at all.  It’s advisable that you look for your city’s post office. I’m pretty sure there’s one near you. There should be!
  2. FILL UP THE POSTAL ID APPLICATION FORM.  As mentioned above, you can download and print the application form from this link , which I really advise you to do in order to save time. At least when you get there, you can just give your application form and your requirements (NSO Certified Birth Certificate and Utility Bill/Barangay Clearance).  I brought both original and photocopies of the requirements just to make sure. They were fine with photocopies, though, even with the Barangay Clearance. The point is just to provide a proof of your residence and that’s it!Take note each applicant needs TWO COPIES of the application form. I’m not sure why, but print two copies anyway and fill up both.CLICK THE PHOTO TO BE REDIRECTED TO THE WEBSITE
  3. SUBMIT YOUR POSTAL ID APPLICATION FORM AND YOUR REQUIREMENTS. The staff on duty should check your information one by one. There are lots of blocks to fill in so it takes a lot of time if you choose to do it there. It will help to arrive there with your documents ready for processing. I want to emphasize this part because it’s a pain in the butt to stay in a hot room and do something so tedious. So save yourself the hassle and come ready with your papers.I repeat, each applicant needs TWO COPIES of the application form, so print two copies if you’re filling it up at home.  If you’re doing it at the post office itself, be ready with the following information (aside from the basic info typically asked):Height (in cm), Weight (in kilo), TIN#, PAGIBIG#,  PhilHealth#, GSIS#, SSS#For the complexion under physical appearance, they only accept FAIR or BROWN. I initially wrote “medium” because in my head there was “light” and “dark”. I thought the best word to describe my skin tone is “medium” since I’m somewhere in between. The lady who assisted me and my brother tried to counter that. And she even thought “fair” was the same as “kayumanggi”.

    UHM NO???? For the love of honesty and natural complexion, please don’t write “fair” if you’re NOT fair-skinned. That’s just a piece of unsolicited advice from your resident Tita. Back to the Postal ID!

  4.  PAY PHP 504 FOR THE POSTAL ID FEE.  I have no idea why it’s so darn expensive when it would only be valid for THREE YEARS, but it is what it is. A friend told me it used to be Php 400 only. If you check on the website, it’s actually Php 414.40! (Darn it, Philippines, when do you plan on updating your websites?) An uncle told me, on the other hand, that it was really cheap and it’s just a piece of paper that you can laminate yourself. But let’s not dig deeper because that was probably way back in 1900’s. Now the Postal ID is improved and has a new look. It already comes in a plastic card ID, hence the increased payment fee.In San Juan’s Post Office, there was only one staff who assisted us with the Postal ID application, and she did everything from checking the application form and requirements to taking our photos and signatures to encoding everything from the form to the computer.  I’m not sure about the other offices although I do hope they have more staff in larger post offices. It would make the procedure way faster!
  5. HAVE YOUR PHOTO TAKEN. You can smile in the ID but you can’t show your teeth. As always, remove your accessories, glasses, and whatever else you have dangling  on your body. There are no photo edits included, so try to look as decent as you can when you get there. No, they’re not going to photoshop off your pimple so come decently. Although to be fair, there was a DIY lighting equipment in the room, so at least you won’t look like crap despite all the sweating and waiting. The Postal ID is only valid for three years so I didn’t really care how I’d look in the ID as long as I’d look decent enough. After having your photo taken, you can choose your best shot.
  6. SCAN YOUR FINGERPRINTS & SIGN DIGITALLY.  After the photo, you’ll be asked to scan your fingerprints specifically your left and right thumbs and index fingers. Then you’ll be asked to place your signature using the electronic signature pad. The staff should check the accuracy of your signatures on the form and on the signature pad (scanned in the computer).  As he goes along, he will scan your documents to the computer one by one. Should corrections be made (in my case, my “complexion”), the document should be scanned again to overwrite the previous one.
  7. ENCODE YOUR INFORMATION. After all that, your information from the form will finally be encoded on the computer. I’m not sure how other post office staff do it, but the lady asked me to stay to check my information on the computer as she typed them. She would even ask me to repeat some information from time to time. This took us long because she types slowly, but I take this is a good safety precaution. At least you would be able to personally check your information. This can prevent errors in the future. I believe it would be a huge hassle if you try to come back just to have your name or birthday corrected.
  8. CLAIM YOUR OFFICIAL RECEIPT.  The last step is to claim your official receipt from the staff after verifying your information. To know that all steps have been accounted for, you’ll scan your finger again for the last time. This receipt you’ll receive once you’re done with all the procedure will serve as a stub once the delivery man arrives with your Postal ID.
    Delivery takes about a month, so I suggest you apply for the Postal ID when you don’t need it yet.  So when the time comes that you’ll be needing it, the one-month delivery period has already passed by (or at least has already started) and you already have your ID with you.  What are cases that you’ll need a Postal ID?According to GOV.PH, “a Postal ID verifies the identity and address of a recipient of letters or parcels through the mail. It can also be used to apply for other government IDs. On February 3, 2015, the Philippine Post Office  announced the opening of 260 capturing sites that process applications for the new and improved Postal ID.”

LET’S HAVE A RECAP! 

  1. FIND YOUR CITY’S POST OFFICE
  2. FILL UP THE POSTAL ID APPLICATION FORM (Download & print at home to save time! Link here)
  3. SUBMIT YOUR POSTAL ID APPLICATION FORM AND YOUR REQUIREMENTS (NSO Birth Certificate & Proof of Address, i.e. Utility Bill named after you or Barangay Clearance)
  4.  PAY PHP 504 FOR THE POSTAL ID FEE
  5. HAVE YOUR PHOTO TAKEN
  6. SCAN YOUR FINGERPRINTS & SIGN DIGITALLY
  7. ENCODE YOUR INFORMATION (The staff will do this for you)
  8. CLAIM YOUR OFFICIAL RECEIPT (official stub to receive your Postal ID) 

THINGS TO REMEMBER:

  • Postal ID delivery takes about a month. But don’t worry, it will be delivered to your doorstep!
  • Each applicant needs TWO COPIES of the application form
  • As of April 17, 2017 (the same day I applied for my Postal ID), the application fee costs Php 504.00
  • Bring both original and photocopy of your documents
  • The entire procedure takes 15-30 minutes (faster when you go with your application form already filled). Given that case, you can already skip to  Step #3.

I hope you find this blog post helpful! In any case, let me know if I missed some details or if you need clarifications. I’d be happy to help you out!

What about you? Have you applied for a Postal ID before? How was your experience?

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Bae Milanes

Bae is a 20-something passion blogger from Manila. She likes hoarding hobbies and trying out new stuff, blogging about her mundane adventures, and tweeting about random realizations and musings.
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